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Surefire Label-Selling Strategies

Whether or not you proactively sell to customers or await their orders, there’s always room for improvement. Both too much and too little prodding can backfire, resulting in dissatisfied and/or unprofitable customers.

The following are basic tips that merit periodic “dusting off” and re-evaluation. We all get busy in our day-to-day duties, and it’s easy to lose sight of bigger-picture issues that can drive or destroy sales.

  1. Don’t offer too many choices. Think about furniture shopping in a variety-packed store as a pertinent example of what can happen when too many choices abound. The first responsibility of a good sales rep is to ask defining questions that narrow down wants and needs. When a customer asks you for guidance, give it to them in bite-sized chunks. They can browse the catalog all they want, but when they’re getting ready to buy, be ready to direct and recommend. Otherwise people often go deer-in-the-headlights because of the perceived overwhelming number of choices and do nothing at all—until a competitor is able to help them focus in on exactly what they want.
  2. Acknowledge and reward right away. When a customer buys from you, provide an unexpected reward once in awhile. It can be a credit toward a future purchase, a product (e.g., a magnet with their company logo), a Starbucks gift card, or just about any type of acknowledgement. That effort can build likeability and trust, two key components to long-term customer loyalty.
  3. Be a squeaky wheel…to a point. When providing a customer quote, find out how they want to handle follow-up. In most cases, a customer will want you to reach out if they haven’t responded within a certain timeframe. Attempt to get their guidance about when it’s appropriate to follow up. Don’t just sit there passively waiting for them to get back to you—unless they specifically direct you not to follow up. Generally, this can be handled simply by asking, “By what date do you want me to get back to you if we haven’t connected before?”
  4. Offer practical tips based on historical buying patterns/preferences. One example is customers with rapidly changing needs or who don’t adequately proofread their artwork. Opaque cover-up labels may be a practical, preferential choice to continually redoing the entire label. Suggesting this type of approach proactively helps your status as a partner, not just a vendor.

If you find yourself in need of selling ideas, never hesitate to reach out to one of our label experts or take advantage of the marketing tools on our web site. Free samples, unbranded sales sheets and catalogs you can customize and share with your customers, and many other tools and tips are available to help you grow your label sales! 800-995-9500  / www.discountlabels.com.